Pollinators and the Food Supply

Did you know that approximately 35 percent of food crops derive at least some benefit from pollinators? Many of the foods we eat would not be possible without the support of our fuzzy friends. Learn more about the impact of pollinators on the food supply in the resources here.

Ebook: Pollinator-Friendly Recipes in Honor of National Honey Month

Bee pollinating thumbnail

Ebook: Pollinator-Friendly Recipes in Honor of National Honey Month

In honor of all the hard work bees and other pollinators, such as butterflies, insects, and birds, do throughout the year pollinating our favorite fruits, nuts and vegetables, we’re celebrating National Honey Month in September with our own end of summer recipe list featuring food produced with help from our pollinator friends

Food Supply

Bees and Food Supply

Food Supply

In the United States, more than $15 billion dollars-worth of crops are pollinated by bees each year. In the United States, honey bees perform most of the insect pollination, with help from other pollinators like ants, bats, bees, beetles, birds, butterflies, flies, moths and wasps.

Apiculture in Transition

Apiculture in Transition

Apiculture in Transition

Every winter, a handful of honey bees across the United States pack their bags in search of warmer weather. Those who opt-out of taking the trip take a cue from the chill in the air and spend the winter huddled in their hives.

Almonds and Bees: The Greatest Pollinator Partnership

Almond Grove

Almonds and Bees: The Greatest Pollinator Partnership

Did you know the success of the almond industry is partially thanks to honey bees? Find out how beekeepers ensure there is enough crop to satisfy demand.

Buzz-Worthy Recipes

Cranberry Bread

Buzz-Worthy Recipes

These Feed a Bee-themed recipes incorporate honey, peaches, cranberries and more delicious foods brought to us by bees and other pollinators!