Pollinator Gardening

Bee pollinating a purple flower
An important consideration for a garden or yard is that bees need year-round access to nectar/honey and pollen.
Every gardener can contribute to providing the pollen and nectar sources needed to keep bees healthy. The first step is determining the plants that will be the most popular with bees in your area. While some annual bedding plants are not attractive to bees, most native perennials will attract both native bees and honey bees. A good tool, the Pollinator Partnership’s Bee Smart mobile app, helps gardeners select the best native plants in their area to attract bees. Bayer’s Feed a Bee initiative encourages people to grow pollinator-attractant plants to provide forage areas for bees. Also, gardeners can consider registering their garden in a national effort to help pollinators.

An important consideration for a garden or yard is that bees need year-round access to nectar/honey and pollen. Learning about and planting a variety of pollinator-attractant plants that bloom across all seasons when bees are active is another way to help bees.

Home gardeners are encouraged to practice good stewardship when using pesticides. Most important is to read and follow the pesticide label. This means using the recommended dose and making applications in a way that does not impact pollinators. For example, do not apply products in windy conditions or when there is a danger of drift onto non-target areas. Also, avoid directly spraying flowers when bees may be foraging on them.

Did you know? Bayer is one of the main users of bee pollination services for our InVigor canola seeds business in Canada. This special hybrid of summer oil seed rape could not be grown without the pollination service provided by honey bees. Canola is normally self-pollinating because its male and female parts are on the same flower. However, InVigor is a cross-pollinated hybrid, thus relying on pollinators to produce its seed.


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